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, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. people will be self interested. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, what is the worst that can
behind the scenes look at the science behind field sobriety tests. they gave us unlimited access and very rare access into kind of behind the scenes. and so -- >> these are real people and real situations, the video is awesome. you don't want to miss this. it's really cool. thanks. >>> well, you can gamble 24 hours a day. 7 days a week at maryland live casino now. that's because maryland voters as you may remember approved the gambling referendum that made it possible and operators say the expanded hours at the hanover facility will lead to more jobs and more revenue for the state. the state's two other casinos have not adopted the 24/7 schedule yet. >>> i am watching your money. on wall street we've been down for four sessions in a row. hopefully we can change things today. but who knows? yesterday, stocks did head into positive territory briefly after lawmakers in the house announced plans to meet sunday to discuss the fiscal cliff. congress and the white house have less than a week to resolve this impasse. but here's where we did end up. checking the numbers for you -- >>> only four da
on 395. back to you. >>> last half hour we gave you a rare glimpse inside the science behind the field sobriety tests. what officers look for and how it all works. >> now we look at the science in action as the officers and our cameras leave the lab and hit the roads. delia goncalves has the exclusive ridealong with park police and this was really interesting. >> reporter: you know, when i spoke to park police during the day, they said these are the signs and this is what we see. we literally saw it all on the roads when we were out with them. this is the holiday season and so certainly very busy for them. unfortunately, when you take a look at this video, it is rare but it does show us just how widespread the problem of drinking and driving is on our local roads. ♪ we first met park police sergeant during the day. >> it's like i say to everybody it's a front row seat to the greatest show on earth. >> reporter: he said his best work at night. so he invited us out friday night to bw parkway. >> we're stopping people that have alcohol levels that are on average a .16 which is double th
♪ >>> kids may have trouble staying up until midnight. today, the maryland science center is hosting the 5th annual midnight noon celebration for kids and families to celebrate together without having to stay up so late. music, arts and crafts and a ball drop, milk shake will be there playing the grammy nominated kids rock and roll. >>> celebration from 10:00 to 2:00 this afternoon. >>> if you can't make it to times square, ring in the new year in baltimore city. the prep work is done at curtis bay. get a clear view of the fireworks from the inner harbor. the team is sponsoring the display and we want to say congratulations to buck showalter. [no audio] [technical difficulties] across town this morning. it's chilly. reisterstown 27. aberdeen 28. [technical difficulties]
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
and steady passions and interests, to that extent, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, w
, activities from 3:00 until midnight for kids. maryland science center is celebrating from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., music, crafts and a ball drops that's going to take place at noon if you want to keep your little ones up so late. if you venture out tonight, mike masco, bundle up, i say. >> i will be in bed by 10:00. >> really? >> i got to work tomorrow. >> the odd thing is, when you get in to come in, i will be getting up as the ball is dropping. >> all right. it going to be cold nonetheless. >> let me know what happens. all goes off without a hitch. >>> the weather will be fine for it. there is no problems, i don't see precipitation. if you are going to go to new york or local, things are okay. maybe things change. we will show you. outside, it's chilly out there, temperatures on most of the sites are in to the 20s, manchester the coldest spots. easton, 20s. glen burnie, feeling like 22. the windchills with the slight westerly wind feeling chilly. notice the clouds on top of us through the 2:00 hour on future trend, that's the deal today. as we move the timeline in to midnight, mostly cl
in good standing, has the assumption that as science, rationalism, and the rationality of society advances, the disenchantment of the world proceeds apace, forces will lose their history shaping saliency. the two biggest forces are religion and ethnicity. everyday, in every region, people refute this. religion, and especially religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity, still drive histoes history. religion is also central to america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending the specialists, let me offer a brief placement of america's founders in the stream of world political philosophy. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. his is a demarcation between the ancients and the moderns. the ancients took their political bearings from their understanding of the best of which people were capable. they sought to and large the likelihood of the emergence of fine and noble leaders. and the fine and noble attributes among them. machiavelli took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew, almost t
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks thinned out while alternative churches are becoming more popular. the arc is symbolic of a transforming religious landscape in new england -- will read a little bit more from the magazine piece this morning to continue to give your thoughts on religion and whether it and loved politics. loraine and michigan. republican number. caller: it influences my voting because -- acs, like before, that is a religion. i should have a right to vote with our savior. a country founded on the bible is not a country at all -- makes it very clear. you have to have your belief system. without it, i think a that will exist. host: kathleen, of riverside, ohio. democratic caller. caller: i grew up catholic and went to catholic school but i am no longer a catholic. i would not define myself as a catholic. i got into comparative religious studies
his testimony before the house science, space and technology committee. i know that our chairman mr. hall will remember that during that testimony, he argued eloquently for the critical importance of giving nasa a sustainable future and a human exploration program that can once again inspire our children and humanity around the world. it seems rather extraordinary that even as we are honoring our hero, neil armstrong, that we face a situation where nasa's budget would be designated, getting the very programs that neil armstrong felt so passionately about. if the same members who vote to honor him today will commit to working in the coming months and years for those exploration goals, to those heights to which he devoted the last years of his life, we will have truly honored neil armstrong in an enduring and meaningful way. with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. hall: madam speaker, i yield five minutes to the very capable majority whip, the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro
coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help and catalyze an emotional discussion. the numbers are speaking. we have had record level drought, we have record-level firestorms, and storms. colorado, texas, the list goes on of places that have been hammered. you have to be foolish, someone like george bush to not process that. you have -- it is incredible. you still have to point out, your house is on fire. you are like, really? that is my take on it as a downtown dj. >> the last question on the left. >> thank you. part of what you said about the gift giving economy. an anthropologist wrote a book on the gift economy and wrote another book on "the ethnography of direct action" which touched on things that happened with occupy. with social movement, the eupepsia -- maybe you can speak to a -- going toward reaction and fizzling out? or you see this accelerating, moving from a creati
enjoyed the mountain after moving back to the area. >>> a step of science fiction is put to the test. a private space flight company the grasshopper lifted off, hovered and then safely touched back down on a launchpad. the company says it's almost ready for a first real liftoff for the reusable rocket. you know, megan, in the past when you see the rockets take off, the rockets you see would just break apart and never be used again. they're going to recycle them. >> it's going to change everything. pretty cool. >>> sorry, massachusetts, it's not going to happen. >> no doubt some people are disappointed about an oscar winner, not going to be leaving your state anytime soon. we'll tell you why ben affleck says he is not running for senate. >>> plus jessica simpson uses twitter to make an official announcement. of course if you read the tweet, you said i already knew that. >>> i'm meteorologist mike massco. this is our interactive radar. you can get it on the google play store and also the i-tune store. some rain and snow moving into the area. it's 33 right now and it's snowing to beat
them to the science center. hosting the midnight noon celebration the party features live music, arts and crafts and a ball drop. new year's activities are free with paid admission to the science center. celebration is at 10:00 a.m. the ball drop is at 12 noon. certainly doing to be chilly through the course of the afternoon. clouds in place, mostly cloudy skies today. temperature of around 43. tonight, we down to 35 at the time of new years. we will fall back to 32. as we head to parkville, checking in and looking here at harford, everything up to speed. no problems up to towson this is what 83 looks like. 83, clear from shawan, all the way downtown.
is going to cost $10 million that is going to be built behind the science museum of virginia. there will be two full football folds, a field house with locker and weight rooms, a drill field and spectator areas. >>> at 6, a racy course on the 50 shades of gray is being offered at the university. now, it's an american studies class that will focus on the book's impasse on society. the professor believes the course is appropriate saying no other contemporaries text on sexuality transformed american culture the way this series has. >>> coming up, dairy clips. milk prices could double if lawmakers dilly dally any longer. why they need to get a move on it. and had to say that. >>> 2013 around the corner. what are you going to do to celebrate? coming up, what the preps are in new york city's time square. if you have a story idea, call the tipline at 202-895-3,000 end send us an e-mail if you want, back after this. ó if you have high blood pressure and get a cold get coricidin hbp. the number one pharmacist recommended cold brand designed for people with hig
eight years and the facility is going to cut about $10 million go behind the science museum of virginia and there will be a field house with locker and weight rooms and a drill fold and spectator areas. sports is next when the news at 10 returns. high praise for the other redskins rookie who could have a franchise record tomorrow night against the cowboys. lindsay murphy is next with sports. tucker. >> the snowstorm is out of here and left in its wake, a lot of wind. you have that less than 33 here in washington and hagerstown. blustery overnight and window sunday. the details on the weather forecast. including the redskins game sunday night and new year's eve monday night.  . >>> how many games has rg3 won for the wizards? >> reporter: think technically, two o. on. >> i think technically two. >> yeah. >> he was there when they played the miami heat. >> oh, my goodness. >> last night, the wizards were like in the fourth quarter and throwing free-throws and a chance rang out. >> yes. >> and everybody was around like where is he? >> right. >> and rg3 is super, too and ev
is expected to cost up to $10 million. it will be built on state owned land behind the science museum of virginia. >>> coming up, we are going to hear how the redskins players are reacting. the big win against the cowboys. >>> and later this hour we'll take you inside the preparations for some of the big new year's eve parties in our area. >>> and big news about the health of president george h.w. bush. keep it here. yoceebatailein niorteuhesal yo cavg anmas u ssrrab. quitnciree aim buthacicevs se od cacae idroon henal ar twe dn, ndoc'tro yo emeba. myenstecmee tht us pnel bau ihes senhe thenme a ielveits i aoo j. because a chicken is what it eats. [ jim ] this seal verifies we feed my fresh all-natural chickens an all-vegetarian diet including corn, soybeans, and marigolds. no animal by-products. no meat and bone meal. when you put my chicken on the table, you know where it came from. that i put on my children's plate. that's why we use all-white meat, breading that is whole grain with omega-3 and no preservatives. it is my goal to make the highest quality, best-tasting nugget on th
today. she was treated sunday for a blood clot. more from nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell who was at the hospital. good morning, robert. >> reporter: good morning, andr andrea. we don't know a lot of what's going on here. columbia university hospital is not saying much. we have a one sentence statement from hillary clinton's office which says, as you said, is being treated for a blood clot and it stemmed from a concussion she suffered a few days ago. the problem is that concussions, when they lead to blood clots, the blood clots are not usually treated with blood thinners as they say she's being treated. if she has a blood clot that occurred because she was sitting around or something, they would treat that with blood thinners and that would be fine. but there may be more to this story that we don't know. we'll have to watch it the next few days. as they say they're keeping her under observation to maek sure she's okay. andrea? >> let's hope for the best and thanks for the update, robert. >>> raising taxes on the wealthy is separating the two parties as the deadline
. >> there is science and magic involved. it's quite fascinating. >> we kind of come to the end of it all. >> yeah, you are right. one of the last time zones. >> with hawaii the last. >> hawaii the last. >> tony said it, norad will be tracking him and there is a web site to go to. >> gps is great. they can track santa. >> we will talk to them during the 9:00 hour. there is their web site. they will track him a little bit later -- has he already started. >> he is fuji heading for -- >> he already started. >> wow. >> they have the number of gifts delivered. >> i don't know how they know that. >> there you go, kennedys, that's the answer. merry christmas to you. if you have a question you want answered, go to and click on the weather tab. >> so exciting. >> i love it. >>> we will see if there is excitement happening on the roadways. let's check in with jeff. >> if we were checking norad, we would see more activity than on the road. prince george's county, nothing like looking at a sunrise in a black and white camera. light volume around the beltway in both directions. over to the wilson bridge
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
news chief science and health correspondent robert bazell is live from new york there in front of the presbyterian hospital. bob, what do we know about secretary clinton's condition and how she is being treated right now? >> richard, we know precious little. we had the one statement yesterday evening from secretary clinton's staff that said she suffered a concussion that was related -- excuse me -- suffered a blood clot related to this concussion. usually when somebody has a blood clot related to a concussion it is in the brain and would not be treated with anticlotting drugs. she is being treated with anticlotting drugs. so maybe she has a blood clot someplace else. we don't know anything -- there have been no statements today either from the hospital here or from the state department or for her personal staff about what her condition is. so, unfortunately, we don't have a lot to report and there is some mystery to this. a lot of doctors tell me that this story doesn't add up. there could be something else wrong with her. we're not saying we know that. the lack of information
during a recent bout with the stomach flu. nbc's chief science and health correspondent bob bazell is at new york presbyterian hospital where secretary clinton is being treated. bob, i know this is a story we're all keeping a very close eye on. what's the latest? we know she has a blood clot that came from -- they say from the concussion. we know it's being treated with anti-coagulant drugs. a lot of doctors are puzzled by that series of events because most blood clots that come from a concussion would be in the brain, and they would not be treated with anti-coagulamt drugs. we don't know where it is or what her condition is. there's been no report about what her health status is other than she's under observation for these two days. there's a lot of puzzles here. a lot of people are hoping for the best, but clearly somebody doesn't come into the hospital over -- in the holiday berd just for a routine check-up, so something is going on. we hope to hear more, and we hope to see that she gets out of here in good shape pretty soon. we really -- i wish i had more informati information.
to continue to be the magnet for the intellectual property of the world. we want to be the science and technology ?oaftors -- innovators that will continue to fuel our economy. it's just how we get there that causes the disagreement. we have patriotic people who have been elected. i hope for the next two years we will put aside the partisan politics, put aside the thoughts of future elections, and try to solve the big issues of our time. because there's a lot of intelligence in this body, there's a lot of ability to come together. and i just keep the abiding faith that our messy democracy will, in fact, prevail because i can't think of going to anything else. and as long as we can function and show the world that we can govern as we disagree, that will be the example that will forever make our country the best and hopefully be a model for others to not think you have to take to the streets, not think that you need guns to have the government that you want but to show that peaceful transition can be done and also that we can have a lot of discussion, a lot of disagreements, but we c
of the arts in favor of science, in favor of technology but it strikes me that what you just said and the context of the book and the fact that we still have the sort of need for the untold stories for the dark secrets is indicative of a kind of historical illiteracilliterac y that exists in our country and that african-americans and that black history in africana history itself with the subject that is most unknown or he raced from our collective consciousness. do you think that historical illiteracy contributes to our present and even to our future? do you see the larger story that you tell here as essential to your vision of the country we ought to live in? >> i don't know that i have thought about it in that way. what i definitely thought about was how reflective her family was of the american story and i wanted very much to imbue it with the history so that people could see that her family had front row seats to some of the most important moments in our history slavery, civil war emancipation, the migration, jim crow, the depression and that all their steps forward and steps
-- >> i actually read that in a science book and when i tried it i thought my customers are either going to think i'm crazy or they're going to like it but they were asking for more. they wanted six or a dozen. it's only a few weeks i've been doing it but it works well. in an oyster you have salt fat, and protein and now we have acid and sugar in the kiwi. those are the five principles of cooking so you have it all. >> you mentioned we have foie gras on the side which can be a little controversial. >> well, now there's a lot of movement particularly in new york state to make the foie gras concept, the process extremely healthy and humane. >> canadians are helping. i don't think there'll be any more issues with the foie gras. you know the romans and the greeks used to eat foie gras. the liver gets naturally large before they migrate. so some are concerned they force the liver to be that large but the bird does it twice a year on its own. >> this might look a little overwhelming for some audience members. >> we have the duck glazed with lick rizorice powder from france
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> good morning. i'm victor blackwell in for carol costello. stories we're watching in "the newsroom" the opening bell at the new york stock exchange rang just a few seconds ago. stocks are poised to open with lower, open lower rather with much of their attention still focused on that fiscal cliff. ringing the opening bell today the startup weekend leadership team. >>> tributes are pouring in this morning for retired general norman schwarzkopf, stormin' norman as he was known died yesterday. he became a household name in the '90s as he led america to victory as commander of coalition forces during the first gulf war. schwarzkopf was 78. >>> craft store giant hobby lobby is bracing for a $1.3 million a day fine. it starts january 1st for bucking some of the rules in the affordable health care law. you see the company opposes providing some contraceptives to its employees tough its company health care plan citing religious grounds. the company says some contraceptive pro
becomes a reality. >> reporter: a harsh reality but one with some science behind it. last year, researchers of sanford university found out once participants were introduced to their future self, they were more likely to save. sounds good in theory but not experts agree it will actually work in practice. >> i'm not actually sure a stark financial physical picture is exactly what they need in order to compel them to action. >> reporter: with more americans retiring later in life and the cost of living going up, experts say two-thirds of boomers will not have enough saved to maintain their standard of live, if they can retire at all. whether or not it will actually inspire people to take action, it certainly gets you thinking. >> it does inspire me to save for retirement, absolutely. >> reporter: now, a big thank you to our brave guinea pig, the 2,000 people who logged on to view this app, unclear how many have been spurred as we heard a lot about new year's resolutions right around the corner, if they get to the new year and decide this was scary enough to get them to start savi
's all rooted in science. your dog or your cat may be depressed. and the treatment that works for humans may work for your pets. it's true. abc's dan harris has the story. >> reporter: of all the absurd things we do for our pets, the massages, the themed birthday parties, the treadmills, the high-end couture. the paris hilton dog house. >> inside is moldings and lighting and heat and air conditioning. >> reporter: of all of the over-the-top pampering, this picture, struck me as the apex of this particular brand of mania. this doe-eyed little pooch is staring into an artificial sunlight generator, in case he's getting depressed from lack of sun exposure. it's made by a company called max lighting. then, i heard of the inventor. max's doctor told him to use a bright box to counter the gloomy days. it worked. not only on max, but on his golden retriever, luke. >> luke and i were basking in the sun. and he was drawn to the light. >> reporter: max did research. and a lot of vets say pets may be getting seasonal affective disorder. a condition that causes depression in humans. and in animal, m
, and how the landscape might look for 2013. we have a political science professor, and danny vargas, president and ceo of the communications and marketing firm. welcome to "viewpoint," to you all. >> happy new year. >> i want to take a big picture look back at 2012, and go around and ask each of you what 2012 would be remembered for? >> my background is in politics, so i would have to go with the presidential election, barack obama being re-elected not withstanding some significant economic concerns going into the beginning of 2012, or a year ago at the end of 2011, it was clear the president would have an uphill battle. and three things struck me as interesting. super packs, the billions raised to reshape voter thinking, and particularly senate and house races, you saw a real impact -- >> in our region. >> absolutely in our region. and that was the first thing that struck me, and the second was turnout. i was among those that believed the president would get 95 or 96% of the african-american vote, and it turned out to be the same. and the same with young voters. and nobody expected
low. we have to lower spending and raise revenue. it's not rocket science. and the unwillingness. what my good friend phil roe didn't say on air was he's taken the pledge. never ever to raise taxes. all but 7 of my republican friends have taken that pledge which is a huge impediment to our getting something done. >> do they have to stick to that pledge? >> i hope they will renounce that pledge. the only pledge worth taking when you get elected to the united states congress is to the constitution of the united states. >> let's back up a little bit. talk about what's happened over the weekend what's going on in the senate and seeing that rita cannot seem to come to any sort of agreement now that the vice president being called in. what does that say when the vice president is being called in to broken some sort of a deal? >> well, obviously, phil roe before me said wouldn't it have been nicer if regular order would have worked? i agree with that but we were out in recess for 15 weeks not doing this job. so the fact that you got to call in the cavalry at the last minute to rescue a deal i
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> when we come back, we're going to talk more about frustrations in washington reaching a boiling point. up next, we'll make sure rick santelli's blood pressure is in an acceptable range. plus the mood from the traders in the futures pit. then the latest on the fiscal cliff negotiations from republican senator bob corker. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> welcome back to "squawk box," everyone. let's take a look at a few stocks that might be on the move. bristol-myers squibb has gotten fda approval for its anti-clotting drug eliquis. it's designed to prevent clot
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)